Access To Medical Cannabis In Washington Is Changing

Access To Medicinal Cannabis Is Changing in Washington.

Access To Medicinal Cannabis Is Changing in Washington.

I started this blog because I wanted to share the challenges and triumphs of using medicinal cannabis. Back then I didn’t know many other cannabis users never mind ones who knew how to use it medicinally. Through books and the internet I taught myself how to cook with it and started eating it for my health issues.

Once I got my medical cannabis recommendation my first access to it was at a chosen dispensary 30 minutes from my house. I would really only buy cannabis flower there because the only other thing they had were edibles ‘poisoned’ with gluten, dairy, and sugar not to mention a little expensive for somebody taking multiple doses each day. From there I would take my flowers and make my own cooking oils and edibles.

These days my access looks much different. I was eventually able to join a collective garden where I not only have access to quality, organic flower but fresh leaves for juicing, and solventless concentrates. While there, I am able to learn how to grow my own garden and ways to process my own plants. This type of insight has been invaluable as a patient who, in the perfect world, would like to eventually grow all my own strain specific garden.

Through networking and visiting every medical cannabis farmer’s market I could, I found a few favorite MMJ growers and processors who I can go to for strain specific cooking oils, superfood edibles, topicals, oral care products, and suppositories at a reasonable cost. I so appreciate having these people in my life. They teach me something each time we talk and I don’t have to work nearly as hard to get the specific medicine that I need. I can give them a list of terpenes that I need and they not only know what I’m talking about, they are able to hand me back products, not just flower, that do exactly what I need them to do.

With the changes to the medical cannabis laws in Washington, my access is also potentially changing back to the similar dispensary experience it was when I started taking it. My collective is being significantly shrunk. They are having to go from 15 plants per patient to 15 plants for the entire collective property to supposedly service everybody involved. While I work with some very impressive growers, time will tell if they are able to produce enough medicine with the new limits.

My access to infused edible makers that only existed in the medical marijuana market are also going to disappear unless they get into the regulated cannabis market. The products will not likely be as cost effective or strain specific if they even exist at all. Who is going to come out with a regulated cannabis suppository? 

One more big change that affects me is the reduction of how much cannabis I am allowed to keep at one time. This could even affect the way I am juicing raw cannabis. The very way that I thrive on cannabis requires plenty of plant matter and while I don’t get high from using it like this, when available I make it an effort to consume several ounces of cannabis in one day if I am taking in in raw juice form. If I couldn’t juice anymore, it would feel like a step backwards in my health management.

The future of medical cannabis in Washington seems to be changing daily and keeping up with these changes to protect myself and my family has been weighing heavily on me. Where I may have felt carefree about using cannabis in the past, for the moment, I feel somewhat oppressed as I am learning and adapting to the changing cannabis laws.

While I’m trying to maintain a positive attitude about the fact that I still have safe access to legal cannabis, I can’t help but feel concerned that my herbal medicine has been severely restricted, not because my doctor has prescribed me less but because uneducated law makers decided it made sense.

-TwiceBakedinWA

7 responses to this post.

  1. You nailed it.

  2. Patients are still working to try and fix the mess the legislators made with SB 5052. There are several court cases in the works.Some have already been filed Patients/carers have also formed their own political action committee so we can support candidates that support us and to give us a voice in Olympia.

  3. Posted by lisa baldwin on July 25, 2015 at 12:54 pm

    This is a sad state of affairs, I appreciate your blog ,as it is encouraging. I too am on a mission to utilize strain specific and raw plant. I was hopefull here in California to work with collective to have jucing available. We are faced with similar reductions in plant to patient and now sacramento county is trying to impose water restrictions as well. Keep fighting the good fight. Blessings

  4. I feel melodramatic by saying this, but I’m so sorry for your loss. I was blown away when I realized at how much the laws in WA were regressing and how much more everything was going to cost. I had no idea until I started working with a company to create a line of edibles in the state. It reeks of corporate/big cannabis lawmaking to me, but I really don’t know much about how the law was formatted and who wrote it. Are you guys allowed to grow your own?

    Rooting for you from Colorado,
    Corinne

  5. Hi Corinne, Thank you for sending positivity. The mmj laws changing here is a major loss for patients. We are still allowed to grow our own but starting next July the amount we can grow has been reduced from 15 plants to 6. Plus, we are going from an allowable 24 oz of dried flower to 3. Totally not good.

  6. Posted by Jeff Sobotka on March 28, 2016 at 1:33 pm

    I just saw this blog. You mentioned about suppositories and why there are no regulated cannabis suppositories. Have you been able to find a source? Great information. Thanks.

  7. I am still looking, Jeff. -TBinWA

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