5 Cannabis Products To Stock Up On Before July

Stockup

The new changes to medical cannabis laws in Washington State go into effect in just over one month. I understand that some cannabis retail stores will be ready to service MMJ patients but the truth is they may not have many of the products currently used by those patients.

I’m taking this pretty serious because otherwise I’ll be back to making my own cannabis medicines and doing an ok job but they are nothing like the medicine from somebody who has been doing it for years and decades. Therefore, I’ll be stocking up on a few things before access changes July 1, 2016.

Here is a list of cannabis products that might be tough to find in WA for a while after July.

  1. Suppositories: Cannabis suppositories are already really tough to come by in this state despite how great they are to have in the medicine cabinet for serious body pain, maximum cannabinoid absorption, and amazing sleep. Unless you stock up or find a company who has stepped up, you will be left to make your own.
  2. Edibles: Right now you can get high dosed edibles in almost every form at reasonable prices. The available doses you are used to will change and if edibles are something that you take daily new prices may be tough on your pocketbook. It is rare to find edibles made without sugar and processed ingredients so you will likely be making your own if cost or healthy ingredients are important to you.
  3. Seeds and clones: It will be pleasantly surprising if patients will be able to buy clones and/or seeds of multiple varieties including those with high CBD. It is unclear weather we will have continued access to seeds or clones and the old schoolers I’ve been talking to are telling me to get seeds now.
  4. Topicals: The cannabis topical situation in Washington is an odd one. In 2015 the CHABA (Cannabis Health And Beauty Aids) bill was passed allowing for any mainstream store to be able to sell cannabis topicals containing less than .3% THC. The weird part is that cannabis processing companies in the 502 system cannot sell their topical products in mainstream stores even if they are not intoxicating or contain less than .3% THC. The companies who can currently sell to mainstream stores are not part of the 502 system, they will no longer be able to source their cannabinoids, and face an uncertain future even though it is deemed legal to sell their products over the counter. That mucky situation will require more legislation but until then you may want to stock up on the Cannabis Basics and the Kush Creams that you can’t get in 502 stores. It is possible they could suffer a lag in production while sourcing gets figured out.
  5. CBD and Strain Specific Products: If you use CBD products that are strain specific with just the right ratios of CBD:THC for you, stock up on those and start searching for companies that may already be making those products in the current legal market.

Basically, everything is what you want to stock up on. Just remember that the amount you are legally allowed to store in your house will also be reduced in July so mind your locker weight.

I spent last week being super social and visiting patients and growers all over Washington. Everybody is feeling the strain of these changes. I am inspired by those who will not be going down without a fight insisting that their current access is necessary for the sick people they look after. I agree, it is necessary to stand up to these new changes especially if they don’t support your health and wellbeing.

And so, I will write on, I will protest, I will help others and together we will not only prevail but heal and transform this momentarily bleak era with positive workable solutions.

-TwiceBakedinWA

 

Cannabis Mamas Will Be Criminals July 1

Norml

NORML Women of Washington May 2016

I’m fresh from the monthly NORML Women of Washington meeting held on the second Saturday of each month at Uptown Espresso in Westlake, Seattle.

I felt some very real anxiety during the meeting when we were talking about what happens to cannabis patients in July. As far as we knew, there are only a few stores that will be set up to provide to cannabis patients when the new laws take effect.

This informed group of cannabis patients, caregivers, and mothers to patients was unable to give a good answer as to where they will be getting their cannabis medicines, come July 1. Correction, they knew where they would be able to get it still but they would become criminals if they did so.

Right now most of us have been getting our medicine from the cannabis farmer’s markets, patient collectives, or medical cannabis shops that had set up under the old laws and are now shutting their doors. We have access to a large number of unique strains, high CBD cannabis, plus specialized small batch tincture, topical, and concentrate artisans. Anything you can imagine I can get already made or I know a gal who can do that. However, the people who have been honing their cannabis crafts and providing to patients for years are now going to be criminals if they keep doing what they are doing without merging into the legal cannabis market.

It is not that we don’t embrace change or want to comply with the new laws, at this point it appears to be an access issue. We have yet to find the medicine we are accustomed to in the new legal market. While this may not seem like a big deal for many, this becomes a very serious issue when there are adults and babies literally being kept alive with specific cannabis medicine.

Imagine if all the drug pharmacies in the state but a few were able to provide for even a couple of months. It would be pill popper pandemonium. 

The stores that sell medical cannabis will be staffed with a state certified MMJ consultant and register you with the state through their system. I have not began to navigate the registry system but I will for sure let you know what it is like. So far, I don’t like it.

The NORML Women of Washington are having a protest on June 30th at Union and 6th in Seattle at the I-5 entrance from 4pm-7pm to demonstrate the fact that we all would become criminals on July 1 if we do not conform to the new limitations being imposed upon us and how it impacts families in Washington. Join Us! 

Over the next 6 weeks I’ll be going to the cannabis farmer’s markets in Black Diamond, Tacoma, and Olympia  as often as possible until they have their final events and shut their doors. It’s a special culture I’m sad to see change and I hope to capture and share as much of it as possible before it is gone.

Through the anxiety of the whole situation, I still feel positive and feel fired up to spread the word that these changes are coming fast and you need to get prepared.

Peace.

-TwiceBakedinWA

 

July Is Coming: What Will Cannabis Patients Do?

July4plant

Coming on July 1, 2016 are major changes to the medical cannabis laws in Washington State. As a cannabis patient, I’m feeling a level of heaviness and uncertainty because the changes affect the way I currently access cannabis.

The changes are across the board from how much I am allowed to have on me, how much I can grow, how much I will pay, whether I want to be on a state registry or not, and where I can purchase my cannabis.

What I can grow will be reduced from 15 plants to 4. The amount of flower that I am able to carry on me will go from 24oz to 3oz. No more patient to patient sharing…and the list goes on.

I currently get a large portion of my supply from the medical cannabis farmers markets and occasionally from one collective storefront near my house that I have frequented for years now. That store is likely getting turned into a retail store with a medical endorsement to service patients who are part of the state registry.

Currently, my least favorite choice is getting cannabis from a store but soon that will be my only option. If I choose to not be on the state’s registry I’m not going to be getting any tax breaks and I would not be able to purchase as much. Regardless of whether or not I get a tax break, I’m pretty sure I’ll still have to pay way more than I’m paying now.

I plan to grow my own this summer but I’m not sure how I feel about being on a registry to be able to grow more than 4 plants.  4 plants won’t allow for much raw juicing so I would certainly want to get permission from my doctor to grow more than 4 plants if I do get on the registry.

Another word about the registry, a medical cannabis authorization does not provide protection from arrest unless you are entered in the medical marijuana authorization database and hold a recognition card. That certainly is an incentive to be on the registry but it once again of feels like patients are being treated as second class citizens.

I’ve been asking other current patients what they are planning to do and they have given me a large variety of answers. Most patients who shop at the farmers markets don’t know where they will go for medicine in July or if they want to be on a registry either. Some say they will grow their own, a few have said they will join the registry, and others have said they are making their connections now to have a guy who can take care of their cannabis needs.

In asking providers what they are planning to do I get a gamet of answers too. Some are not sure,  some are transitioning into the regulated marketplace, and some will hand you a card and offer to become your cannabis ‘guy.’

I was once mildly excited about the regulation of medical cannabis but after watching the retail system deal with pesticide grown weed I can’t help but be concerned about the quality controls for my medicine despite this required testing. If they haven’t been able to achieve quality control in the current system that has been running for over two years, how is the newly regulated medical marijuana system going to be an improvement over the unregulated, organic, frequently tested, tax free cannabis that I have access to right now?

I continue the quest to become a master cannabis grower so I can ideally manage my own supply. I know the changes will be a tough pill to swallow for many and am curious to see if people who are sick, low income, and frequently on disability will be able to afford regulated medical cannabis not covered by insurance and what new brands will step up to provide help for those in need, if possible.

The positives at the end of the day, I still have legal access to medical cannabis to manage my own chronic health conditions and I can still grow my own.

If you need to learn more about the upcoming changes, here is a link for the Department of Health website about medical cannabis laws:

http://www.doh.wa.gov/YouandYourFamily/Marijuana/MedicalMarijuana/Laws

Stay safe my friends.

-TwiceBakedinWA

 

 

Double Hemp Protein Bars

Hempbars

I made Double Hemp Protein Bars earlier this week and immediately had to make a double batch the next day, they are that good. One of the reasons I am so excited about this recipe is that it is delicious new way for me to use protein hemp powder, an ingredient that I have mostly just used in smoothies until now.  Plus, I discovered a new love for freeze dried fruit and the way they add a pleasurable, sweet, airy crunch to any bite.

I already have a number of variations of this recipe swimming around in my head with other fruit and flavor possibilities not to mention it would be easy to use cannabis infused coconut oil for a healthy edible. May I also point out that there is no processed sugar, gluten, dairy, or eggs necessary to making these. There is however, plenty of hemp.

Protein Hemp Bars (yields about 16)

2/3C hemp seeds

1/2C hemp protein powder

1C shredded coconut

2/3C pumpkin seeds

1C freeze dried strawberries

1/3C melted coconut oil

1/4C cacao nibs (optional)

10 medjool dates

pinch of salt

  1. Cream together dates and coconut oil in a food processor until it resembles a paste.
  2. Pulse pumpkin seeds and coconut in a food processor to a course crumble and add to date mixture.
  3. Add all other ingredients and combine well.
  4. Pour crumbly mixture onto a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper
  5. Press mixture into a firm 1/2″ thick square.
  6. Chill in fridge until firm.
  7. Cut into single sized bars and store in an airtight container in the fridge or freezer.

It only takes about 10 minutes to put these together not including the chill time. Simple, delicious, nutritious. Hope you enjoy and please share your variations in the comments!

-TwiceBakedinWA

CBD Turmeric Bone Broth Recipe

File Mar 14, 10 36 34 AM

I spend a lot of energy promoting a plant based way of eating but that conversation shifts when we start talking about bone broths.

I swear by taking bone broth for improving immunity, moods, brain function, digestion, and reducing inflammation. A good bone broth is full of health boosting minerals, gelatin, collagen, glutathione, glucosamine and packaged in a form that is easy to swallow and absorb.

About once a month I will cook a whole organic chicken, debone it, and put the carcass and any parts that won’t be eaten into the crockpot and brew a big batch of bone broth.

Once made it can be used in all sorts of recipes or easily frozen for later use. One of my favorite ways to take it is simply to sip it plain with a little hot water, salt, and pepper.

During this month’s batch I decided to try infusing it with a high CBD (cannabidiol) cannabis kief and powdered turmeric. The results were great. I’ve had it first thing in the morning, in the middle of the day, and for dinner and no matter what it feels like I have done something good for myself.

CBD Turmeric Bone Broth

-bones and scraps from 1 organic chicken

-1T apple cider vinegar

-1 gram kief

-2T turmeric, or more

  1. Put the chicken parts in a crock pot and fill to about an inch from the top.
  2. Add apple cider vinegar and let sit over night on low. (This helps to bring nutrients out of the bones.)
  3. Remove all chicken parts and separate the liquid through a strainer.
  4. Return the liquid broth to the crockpot, add kief and turmeric, and let sit on low overnight.
  5. Use immediately or freeze individual portions for later use.

Notice that I did not decarboxylate my cannabis, which is something you may want to do before you add it to the broth. I didn’t feel the need to do so with this recipe or this particular strain of CBD (cannabidiol) rich kief.

If you are new to taking turmeric, feel good about adding lots in as it is beneficial for reducing inflammation, improving digestion, lowering blood sugar, increases bile production. It is mild in flavor and a bright yellow color that will bring extra life to your food.

Eat well.

-TwiceBakedinWA

 

Cannabis Love Juice

Cannabis Love Juice

Cannabis Love Juice

I woke up this morning with a stiff body and a desire for a fresh juice to take with a morning shot of cannabis juice. I needed something simple and easy to digest first thing.

What I ended up building was a juice with beets, raw cannabis, and apples. Love juice. The end product came out super red, sweet, and delicious.

Cannabis Love Juice:

1 apple

1 large red beet

1 handful of raw cannabis leaves

  1. Put all ingredients through the juicer.
  2. Drink immediately.

What Is Low THC Dosing?

 

leblancCNE

Like many cannabis patients in this current era, when I started using medical cannabis I had little direction as to how to be using it right for me. The reality is that because cannabis is such a unique medicine for each individual your doctor can’t exactly tell you how much to take or not take, you can only figure that out together by taking it and adjusting doses as necessary.

While cannabis is non-toxic we each have our own threshold for how much cannabis is right for us as an individual. Don’t take enough and you won’t experience all the benefits or take too much you won’t experience all the benefits. Find your sweet spot and the body can find true homeostasis.

One of the things I am grateful to have learned is the concept of low THC dosing. When I initially started using cannabis I did so with the intention to not get too high but to be able to function and still have relief for chronic pain. I didn’t know about CBD and I had yet to experience the benefits of topicals and raw cannabis juicing. So, it was all about the THC.

As it turns out I tolerate THC very well, can take it all day long and figured that since I could tolerate so much my body needed that much and it must be okay to do so long term. It used to be nothing to take a 150mg THC bedtime edible or a 50mg THC edible first thing in the morning and focus on whether the varieties of cannabis I was using were daytime energizing or night time relaxing.

Then I started focusing on increasing my intake of other cannabinoids like CBD and THCA and utilizing terpenes. I also embraced this idea of thoughtfully only taking a low dose of THC as part of my overall consumption which involved a change in how I was using cannabis. Less vaping and high THC edibles and more CBD tinctures/edibles, raw juicing, and topicals.

I started a new cannabis journal with the intention of discovering my ideal usage with smaller amounts of THC. Turns out my body functions well with lower doses of THC than I initially was using. The change also increased my sensitivity to THC which is a very pleasant thing for somebody who has a high tolerance.

I take this cannabis stuff very seriously because it is part of my long term wellness and chronic pain management program. It is imperative to dwell in my homeostasis sweet spot so that I can truly achieve the wellness that lives within me.

So, when it comes to THC (and cannabis in general) start slow, go low.

-TwiceBakedinWA