Posts Tagged ‘cannabis’

The Healthy Cannabis Lifestyle Project

A few years back, at some cannabis industry event, I met Jerry Whiting. If you’ve ever met Jerry, you probably know he is a jovial, kind, and generous man who does a lot for the cannabis community and has a great deal of knowledge about using the plant for improving health in those with serious ailments and also those who are healthy and wanting to stay that way.

Jerry and pj

Jerry was the one who introduced me to the experience of regularly using cannabidiol (CBD) as part of my cannabis regimen. His line of LeBlanc CNE high CBD and low THC tinctures proved to be life altering in my long term cannabis use. He is also the one who taught me exactly how to decarboxylate cannabis without all the bad information that exists out there on the interweb. Here is a link if you want to learn how to decarb too…

This year Jerry, through his brand LeBlanc CNE, launched an educational cannabis health podcast  peppered with special guests and his own very entertaining stories. I am happy and privileged to be a regular contributor on the podcast. Here is the show Jerry and I recently did about using cannabis as part of a healthy lifestyle.

I also recently launched a motivational food and health blog, Butterfly Sessions, as part of my work as a holistic health coach. Follow me there for motivation to keeping a healthy lifestyle and original recipes of seasonal, hemp, gluten free, dairy free, sugar free meals and treats that are easy to prepare, delicious, and nutritious.

Peace.

 

Should I Get On The New MMJ State Registry?

Register

My life with cannabis changed last week. Actually the laws surrounding medical cannabis is what changed and I am just trying to keep up.

Another loophole has been added for Washington cannabis patients, they must now register with the state through a state licensed retail marijuana store unless they are ok with only growing four plants, paying full tax should they ever buy from stores, and not having arrest protection should they ever be dealing with law enforcement.

When I first got my recommendation five years ago I remember how grateful I was to be able to get and use cannabis legally even though the process felt very strange in how it pushed me out of the traditional western medical system to get it. It all felt like a positive thing even though there were a number of steps and loopholes to jump through to legally be able to use it.

While I still feel very grateful to legally be able to use medical cannabis I have been surrounded and influenced by many personalities with very different opinions about the new state registry.

The majority of patients have told me they are not going to participate in the optional state registry and boldly/quietly do what they were doing before the new laws were made limiting possession, home grow, and access to current available medicines. They believe that the way the registry is set up goes against our rights as patients. Not to mention they are all steaming and freshly wounded from the changes to the law without adequate places to go when the law changed. I get it, believe me. The whole thing makes me want to puke.

I also have a whole other court of people in my cannabis life who say the registry is worth the arrest protection and legal defense not to mention the “freedoms” it allows for if you grow your own.

Do I think they are going to watch me extra close and raid me because I am now on a registry so I can grow and eat my own cannabis plants? Anything is possible with prohibition. (If they are not already watching, hi, I’m TwiceBaked in Washington- law abiding cannabis patient, hemp foodie, positivity spitfire. Nice to meet you.)

Upon renewing my medical cannabis recommendation last month, I asked my doctor to indicate on my card that I need to grow more than 4 plants in order to access regular fresh cannabis juice. That was the first step of the new invasive steps I have to follow.

Next, I have to register. I’m not sure where to go that isn’t at least an hour long drive from my house and as of yesterday I heard retail stores were having issues accessing the registry and were not actually able to hand out cards. But, sometime after the long weekend I will spend time, gas, and precious energy to keep up with the law.

I’m not happy about the changes in the “Patient Protection Act” but I am trying to keep a forward thinking attitude. Despite the loopholes, the poorly executed meld of recreational and medical, the limitations, the expense, and the effort it takes to remain a law abiding cannabis patient in Washington State it is still (arguably) better than no access which is the case for much of the world.

The legal cannabis scene is a rollercoaster to be involved with. I’ve come to realize that I am better in this world using cannabis for my health and that I can personally do much more to spread the good that this plant does if I follow the rules- however full of bullshit they may be.

That being said, I also stand with and support my fellow patients who choose to stay off of the registry for their own reasons and am very curious to hear of the insanity that will likely ensue from patients who may not able to follow the rules initially because the medicine they currently use is not available in stores or they can’t afford it now because it costs way more than they have been paying.

Whatever your stance is on being on the state registry, stay safe and stay well.

-TwiceBakedinWA

 

 

Saying Goodbye To Medical Cannabis In Washington State

Mmjuniverse

MMJ Universe Cannabis Farmer’s Market in Black Diamond Washington

There are less than two weeks left before new medical cannabis regulations go into effect in Washington State. For those of us who get our cannabis medicine from the current system that patients have been using since the 90’s, this is a big change nobody is looking forward to.

As I was driving out to MMJ Universe in Black Diamond this past Saturday I found tears streaming down my face thinking about this being one of the last times I would be making that sweet drive in the country to spend time shopping for cannabis in an open market environment.

I’ve been feeling a touch reminiscent about my times out at that specific market where I have met hundreds of patients and growers. Through regular market visits and attending events held there I have been able to plug in with the cannabis community.

I started going there before the adult use of cannabis was legalized in Washington State and I have been able to observe an evolution that the market has taken not only with how beautiful the grounds have become but also to how the market itself has changed over the years.

When I first started attending the market almost every table had a bong or pipe set up so you could sample their products right there. When you walked in the doors it was often a little cloudy and everybody was relaxed with their with cannabis. This was a unique shopping experience, very new to me, and very refreshing to be around. Eventually the smoking was moved outside and while that mildly changed the experience, the freedom felt and education given to patients at the market continued.

When I talked to Diedre, the owner of MMJ Universe, she said she is planning a big celebration on the 30th of June with music and vending to shed some happiness despite how sad so many of us are to be losing our beloved market.

I have much to celebrate from the gains that I have received from that market and even as the tears again roll down my face thinking that it is closing all I can do is thank Diedre and everybody involved in keeping the market going for so long and for focusing on positives and solutions at the end of this medical cannabis era.

-TwiceBakedinWA

5 Cannabis Products To Stock Up On Before July

Stockup

The new changes to medical cannabis laws in Washington State go into effect in just over one month. I understand that some cannabis retail stores will be ready to service MMJ patients but the truth is they may not have many of the products currently used by those patients.

I’m taking this pretty serious because otherwise I’ll be back to making my own cannabis medicines and doing an ok job but they are nothing like the medicine from somebody who has been doing it for years and decades. Therefore, I’ll be stocking up on a few things before access changes July 1, 2016.

Here is a list of cannabis products that might be tough to find in WA for a while after July.

  1. Suppositories: Cannabis suppositories are already really tough to come by in this state despite how great they are to have in the medicine cabinet for serious body pain, maximum cannabinoid absorption, and amazing sleep. Unless you stock up or find a company who has stepped up, you will be left to make your own.
  2. Edibles: Right now you can get high dosed edibles in almost every form at reasonable prices. The available doses you are used to will change and if edibles are something that you take daily new prices may be tough on your pocketbook. It is rare to find edibles made without sugar and processed ingredients so you will likely be making your own if cost or healthy ingredients are important to you.
  3. Seeds and clones: It will be pleasantly surprising if patients will be able to buy clones and/or seeds of multiple varieties including those with high CBD. It is unclear weather we will have continued access to seeds or clones and the old schoolers I’ve been talking to are telling me to get seeds now.
  4. Topicals: The cannabis topical situation in Washington is an odd one. In 2015 the CHABA (Cannabis Health And Beauty Aids) bill was passed allowing for any mainstream store to be able to sell cannabis topicals containing less than .3% THC. The weird part is that cannabis processing companies in the 502 system cannot sell their topical products in mainstream stores even if they are not intoxicating or contain less than .3% THC. The companies who can currently sell to mainstream stores are not part of the 502 system, they will no longer be able to source their cannabinoids, and face an uncertain future even though it is deemed legal to sell their products over the counter. That mucky situation will require more legislation but until then you may want to stock up on the Cannabis Basics and the Kush Creams that you can’t get in 502 stores. It is possible they could suffer a lag in production while sourcing gets figured out.
  5. CBD and Strain Specific Products: If you use CBD products that are strain specific with just the right ratios of CBD:THC for you, stock up on those and start searching for companies that may already be making those products in the current legal market.

Basically, everything is what you want to stock up on. Just remember that the amount you are legally allowed to store in your house will also be reduced in July so mind your locker weight.

I spent last week being super social and visiting patients and growers all over Washington. Everybody is feeling the strain of these changes. I am inspired by those who will not be going down without a fight insisting that their current access is necessary for the sick people they look after. I agree, it is necessary to stand up to these new changes especially if they don’t support your health and wellbeing.

And so, I will write on, I will protest, I will help others and together we will not only prevail but heal and transform this momentarily bleak era with positive workable solutions.

-TwiceBakedinWA

 

July Is Coming: What Will Cannabis Patients Do?

July4plant

Coming on July 1, 2016 are major changes to the medical cannabis laws in Washington State. As a cannabis patient, I’m feeling a level of heaviness and uncertainty because the changes affect the way I currently access cannabis.

The changes are across the board from how much I am allowed to have on me, how much I can grow, how much I will pay, whether I want to be on a state registry or not, and where I can purchase my cannabis.

What I can grow will be reduced from 15 plants to 4. The amount of flower that I am able to carry on me will go from 24oz to 3oz. No more patient to patient sharing…and the list goes on.

I currently get a large portion of my supply from the medical cannabis farmers markets and occasionally from one collective storefront near my house that I have frequented for years now. That store is likely getting turned into a retail store with a medical endorsement to service patients who are part of the state registry.

Currently, my least favorite choice is getting cannabis from a store but soon that will be my only option. If I choose to not be on the state’s registry I’m not going to be getting any tax breaks and I would not be able to purchase as much. Regardless of whether or not I get a tax break, I’m pretty sure I’ll still have to pay way more than I’m paying now.

I plan to grow my own this summer but I’m not sure how I feel about being on a registry to be able to grow more than 4 plants.  4 plants won’t allow for much raw juicing so I would certainly want to get permission from my doctor to grow more than 4 plants if I do get on the registry.

Another word about the registry, a medical cannabis authorization does not provide protection from arrest unless you are entered in the medical marijuana authorization database and hold a recognition card. That certainly is an incentive to be on the registry but it once again of feels like patients are being treated as second class citizens.

I’ve been asking other current patients what they are planning to do and they have given me a large variety of answers. Most patients who shop at the farmers markets don’t know where they will go for medicine in July or if they want to be on a registry either. Some say they will grow their own, a few have said they will join the registry, and others have said they are making their connections now to have a guy who can take care of their cannabis needs.

In asking providers what they are planning to do I get a gamet of answers too. Some are not sure,  some are transitioning into the regulated marketplace, and some will hand you a card and offer to become your cannabis ‘guy.’

I was once mildly excited about the regulation of medical cannabis but after watching the retail system deal with pesticide grown weed I can’t help but be concerned about the quality controls for my medicine despite this required testing. If they haven’t been able to achieve quality control in the current system that has been running for over two years, how is the newly regulated medical marijuana system going to be an improvement over the unregulated, organic, frequently tested, tax free cannabis that I have access to right now?

I continue the quest to become a master cannabis grower so I can ideally manage my own supply. I know the changes will be a tough pill to swallow for many and am curious to see if people who are sick, low income, and frequently on disability will be able to afford regulated medical cannabis not covered by insurance and what new brands will step up to provide help for those in need, if possible.

The positives at the end of the day, I still have legal access to medical cannabis to manage my own chronic health conditions and I can still grow my own.

If you need to learn more about the upcoming changes, here is a link for the Department of Health website about medical cannabis laws:

http://www.doh.wa.gov/YouandYourFamily/Marijuana/MedicalMarijuana/Laws

Stay safe my friends.

-TwiceBakedinWA

 

 

Cannabis Love Juice

Cannabis Love Juice

Cannabis Love Juice

I woke up this morning with a stiff body and a desire for a fresh juice to take with a morning shot of cannabis juice. I needed something simple and easy to digest first thing.

What I ended up building was a juice with beets, raw cannabis, and apples. Love juice. The end product came out super red, sweet, and delicious.

Cannabis Love Juice:

1 apple

1 large red beet

1 handful of raw cannabis leaves

  1. Put all ingredients through the juicer.
  2. Drink immediately.

What Is Low THC Dosing?

 

leblancCNE

Like many cannabis patients in this current era, when I started using medical cannabis I had little direction as to how to be using it right for me. The reality is that because cannabis is such a unique medicine for each individual your doctor can’t exactly tell you how much to take or not take, you can only figure that out together by taking it and adjusting doses as necessary.

While cannabis is non-toxic we each have our own threshold for how much cannabis is right for us as an individual. Don’t take enough and you won’t experience all the benefits or take too much you won’t experience all the benefits. Find your sweet spot and the body can find true homeostasis.

One of the things I am grateful to have learned is the concept of low THC dosing. When I initially started using cannabis I did so with the intention to not get too high but to be able to function and still have relief for chronic pain. I didn’t know about CBD and I had yet to experience the benefits of topicals and raw cannabis juicing. So, it was all about the THC.

As it turns out I tolerate THC very well, can take it all day long and figured that since I could tolerate so much my body needed that much and it must be okay to do so long term. It used to be nothing to take a 150mg THC bedtime edible or a 50mg THC edible first thing in the morning and focus on whether the varieties of cannabis I was using were daytime energizing or night time relaxing.

Then I started focusing on increasing my intake of other cannabinoids like CBD and THCA and utilizing terpenes. I also embraced this idea of thoughtfully only taking a low dose of THC as part of my overall consumption which involved a change in how I was using cannabis. Less vaping and high THC edibles and more CBD tinctures/edibles, raw juicing, and topicals.

I started a new cannabis journal with the intention of discovering my ideal usage with smaller amounts of THC. Turns out my body functions well with lower doses of THC than I initially was using. The change also increased my sensitivity to THC which is a very pleasant thing for somebody who has a high tolerance.

I take this cannabis stuff very seriously because it is part of my long term wellness and chronic pain management program. It is imperative to dwell in my homeostasis sweet spot so that I can truly achieve the wellness that lives within me.

So, when it comes to THC (and cannabis in general) start slow, go low.

-TwiceBakedinWA